Trampoline

Continuing with the series of flash fiction challenges, my next was for the Nonsense Writing Challenge, also on Chris Fielden’s site. “Trampoline” is my contribution to the challenge. Once Chris receives 100 authors for this piece, an anthology is published whereby profits raised go towards another chosen charity (details of which are available on his challenge page).

 

Trampoline

by Gavin Biddlecombe

“This bouncymathingy is defective,” shouted the Troll, dragging a trampoline behind him.

The flustered salesman, caught unawares, looked around him. Now the centre of unwanted attention, his other customers refrain from their spending activities, drawn in by the curious character.

“I’m sorry, sir, what seems to be the issue?”

“Just look at my horns. They’re bent.”

“Aren’t they always bent?”

The Troll pondered, “Good point. But still, look at my bashed head.”

“And this ‘bouncymathingy’ caused that?” asked the salesman, examining the item. “It looks fine to me. Did you fall off it?”

“Of course I didn’t fall off. I came in yesterday and had a recommended practice session before I bought it.”

“I see.”

“Yeah.” The Troll responded. “I was hoping to give those three gruffy billy goats a scare as they trotted passed. All I ended up with was this sore head.”

“And they did that to you?” asked the salesman.

“What? No. I had another practice before they turned up but it doesn’t seem to work very well under my bridge though.”

“You used it under the bridge?”

“Does it matter?”

“I imagine it’s a low bridge.”

“What’s your point?”

The salesman relaxed as his customers continued.


 

Cinnamon

Cinnamon is my contribution to the Adverb Writing Challenge, found on Chris Fielden’s website, or to use its full name Mike’s Not-Entirely-Serious Wantonly-Rule-Breaking Adverb Writing Challenge”. Trying to recite this can only result in some tongue knotting, so I can understand why it was shortened.

Their aim is to highlight some common writing mistakes and force the writer to use them to create some seriously, or not entirely serious as the above name suggests, flash fiction. I was keen to get involved and there is a maximum 100-word limit for this one (excluding title).

With every 100 submissions, their team edits and creates an anthology where profits go to an assigned charity. In this case, First Story. You can learn more about this on my writing challenges page.


 

Cinnamon

By Gavin Biddlecombe

Sneakily, she snuck out of the corner of the room, slowly inching forward until she reached the base of the extremely comfy looking double bed.

Stretching her neck over the edge by their feet, she quietly peered at the two people sleeping restfully.

“Good” she thought cheekily, “this time I’ll successfully reach my target”. Stealthily climbing up, she crept methodically along until eventually finding the perfectly ideal spot.

In between them, she happily curled up, licked her lips and gave a final wag of her curly tail as she dreamily shut her eyes for a comfortably peaceful sleep.

 


 

Adverbially_Challenged_Volume_3_front_cover

Skydiving Not Quite For Beginners

Skydiving Not Quite For Beginners is my contribution to the 81 Words Writing Challenge. I came across it on Christopher Fielden’s website as I needed a few extra prods to keep me writing and having bought his book on how to write short stories, I also checked out his site.

81 Words requires the flash fiction to be exactly 81 words, excluding the title. Skydiving Not Quite For Beginners has been greatly thinned from its original draft. It took several attempts to get there but I got it down to a coherent format. It’s incredible how much can be said with so few words. Just consider Ernest Hemingway’s six-word story:

For sale: baby shoes, never worn.

Six thought-provoking words…

Back to the 81 Words, it’s a great little challenge and well worth giving it a go (see link above for further information).

Also, good luck to Chris who’s also trying to achieve a Guinness World Record for most contributing authors in one book. The aim is 1000. At the time of writing, 330 stories have been received. 670 more required to publish the anthology.


Skydiving Not Quite For Beginners

by Gavin Biddlecombe

“Wind’s too loud. You need to speak up.”

“Jack, right?”

“Yeah.”

“I’m Dave.”

“Hi Dave. New to skydiving?”

“Pretty much. This is my first solo jump.”

“I figured. Haven’t had any lessons have you?”

“What makes you say that, Jack?”

“What you’re looking at isn’t your altimeter. That’s your wrist watch.”

“No problem. I reckon I can get the timing right.”

“Brings me to my next question.”

“Best be quick before I pull the cord.”

“Why the rucksack?”

“Ah. Now then…”